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Yorkshire Dales and the surrounding area

 

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Aysgarth Waterfalls walk from Aysgarth
A circular from the National Park Centre at Aysgarth in Wensleydale taking in three flights of waterfalls in a delightful short woodland walk. The waterfalls have been a popular attraction since the early 19th century, when Wordsworth used to visit. Turner and Ruskin have painted the falls and they were even the setting for a fight scene in the Hollywood film Robin Hood - Prince of Thieves. The walk takes in Middle and then Lower falls before heading out past Hollins house where you get a view of Castle Bolton. The return is via St Josephs and Freeholders' woods before passing back through the car park before visiting the Upper Falls.

Ellerbeck and Bruntscar walk from Chapel-le-Dale
In looking at a ratio of effort put in to a walk in relation to views attained, this walk must rate very highly. The walk, all on tracks, lanes and a short section of a 'B' road is suitable in all weathers, as it keeps quite low, but the views on clear days of Ingleborough, Whernside, Ribblehead viaduct and the general Yorkshire Dales scenery are simply outstanding. The walk follows a short circular route from Chapel-le-Dale, past the church along the track to Ellerbeck. It then heads along the base of Whernside to Bruntscar before joining part of the 'Yorkshire 3 Peaks' route back down to 'B' road near the Old Hill Inn and then on to the car park.

Feizor Circular walk from Austwick
A circular walk starting from the Game Cock Pub in Austwick, mainly along tracks so suitable for wetter days. The walk passes around Oxenber and Wharfe woods and offers excellent views of the typical dales landscape. As soon as height is gained there are wonderful panoramic views of initially Ingleborough and its surrounds and then further on around to Pen-y-ghent and Fountains Fell. If your timing is right, there is a tea room in Feizor to have a short break from the walk! There is also an alternative parallel, mainly field path, which can be taken on the return from Feizor.

Ingleborough walk via Ingleborough Cave, Trow Gill, Gaping Gill and Little Ingleborough
Ingleborough, one of the 'Yorkshire 3 Peaks', is arrived at by way of way of 3 natural delights of the Yorkshire Dales. Leaving Clapham, the path makes its way up to Ingleborough Cave, where time can be spent visiting one of the best show caves in the country. Then on to Gaping Gill, a 105m deep pothole by way of Trow Gill, an ever narrowing gorge. Little Ingleborough is ascended on the way up to Ingleborough's summit. The walk heads down to Sulber and then affords wonderful views across Moughton Scars, before returning to Clapham via Long Lane.

Ingleton Waterfalls walk from Ingleton
The Ingleton waterfalls walk in the Yorkshire Dales is one of the most spectacular waterfall and woodland walks in the UK - if Carlsberg did waterfall walks, this would probably be the best waterfall walk in the world! The walk is easy to follow and passes Pecca Falls, Hollybush Spout, Thornton Force, Beezley Falls, Rival Falls, Baxenghyll Gorge and Snow Falls. The trail leads through ancient oak woodland and typical Yorkshire Dales scenery via these stunning waterfalls and other geological features. A good time to go is a day or two after heavy or prolonged rain, with my personal favourite being late April, with the spring flowers in full bud but before the leaves come back on the trees. The walk is open seven days a week, throughout the year (closed Christmas Day) and opens at 9am. Closing times vary throughout the year.

Janet's Foss, Gordale Scar and Malham Cove walk from Malham
A circular from Malham, taking in all the natural wonders the area has to offer. Malham is a small village in the Yorkshire Dales, but is a great draw amongst walkers, ornithologists and tourists in general, due to the easy accessibility of the natural wonders surrounding it. The walk starts in the village centre and follows Malham beck and then Gordale beck, before passing through a delightful wooded area to reveal Janet's Foss, a waterfall set in its own little amphitheatre. A few yards further on, Gordale Scar is reached, a gorge with limestone cliffs over 100m high. The walk retraces its steps to Gordale bridge and then on over a short climb to reach the limestone pavement above Malham Cove. After admiring the pavement, head down to the foot of the cove and away from it to reveal the cove in its full splendour. The cove is over 80m high and 300m wide and once was the site of a waterfall higher than Niagara falls! The cove is a favourite with ornithologists, with the peregrine falcon a visitor here. From the cove, a gravelled path is followed back to the road, which leads through Malham back to the car park.

Pen-y-ghent walk from Horton in Ribblesdale
A circular from Horton in Ribblesdale over one of the 'Yorkshire Three Peaks'. The walk heads to Brackenbottom before climbing steadily over Brackenbottom Scar to join up with the Pennine Way path. This is followed up to the summit of Pen-y-ghent before dropping back down and returning via two short detours to Hunt and Hull Pots. The return to Horton is then via the enclosed walled Horton Scar lane, which offers panoramic views of the whole area.

Place Fell walk from Patterdale
A circular from Patterdale up to Boredale Hause and then around up on to Place Fell itself. Wainwright said of Place Fell "Few fells are so well favoured as Place Fell for appraising neighbouring heights. It occupies an exceptionally good position in the curve of Ullswater, in the centre of a great bowl of hills; its summit commands a very beautiful and impressive panorama. On a first visit to Patterdale, Place Fell should be an early objective, for no other viewpoint gives such an appreciation of the design of this lovely corner of Lakeland." The walk then follows the broad ridge to the North-East to gradually descend close to Scalehow Beck and its waterfalls to reach Ullswater. The final three miles of the walk back to Patterdale follow close to the shore of Ullswater along its undulating shoreline path.

Ruskin's View and St Mary's Church walk from Devil's Bridge, Kirkby Lonsdale
This easy stroll is a wonderful way to see Kirkby Lonsdale and its many delights, the only climb being the '86' radical steps just before you reach Ruskin's view. This short circular walk can be started from any part of the walk and if you want to break off to enjoy Kirkby Lonsdale's many shops, narrow lanes, pubs, restaurants and tea rooms, you can. Kirkby Lonsdale is a historic market town, known by many for Devil's Bridge, dating back to around 1370 and Ruskin's view, which he described as the loveliest view in England and therefore the world. The scene has also been painted by Turner. Both these are visited on this short walk. The centre of Kirkby Lonsdale is a mix of elegant well preserved 18th-century buildings and stone cottages built around cobbled courtyards and narrow alleyways with names such as Salt Pie Lane, Horse Market and Jingling Lane.

Whernside walk from Ribblehead Viaduct
A circular from the Ribblehead Viaduct over one of the 'Yorkshire Three Peaks'. The walk follows the 'Three Peaks walk' path for most of its route, initially following alongside the Settle to Carlisle railway line, before heading up on the path towards Dent. The path then steepens over Knoutberry Hill before following a wall along to the summit of Whernside. The panorama from here ranges from Pendle Hill to the South, round to the Morecambe Bay and then the Lakeland Fells and the Howgills. The return is via a steep drop down to Bruntscar, before leaving the 'Three Peaks path' to turn left eventually passing Winterscales to come out through a tunnel under the railway. The outward path is then followed for the short journey back to the parking area.

Yorkshire Three Peaks Walk - Part 1: Horton in Ribblesdale to Ribblehead
The Yorkshire Three Peaks Walk is a very demanding but rewarding walk, which takes in the summits of Pen-y-ghent (694 metres - 2,276 feet), Whernside (736 metres - 2,415 feet) and Ingleborough (723 metres 2,372 feet) all in one circular route. There is no set starting point, but the vast majority of walkers start at Horton in Ribblesdale, taking in the summits in the order shown above. This first section as described here starts from Horton in Ribblesdale and heads via Brackenbottom up to pick up the Pennine Way and on over Pen-y-ghent. The route heads on close to Hunt and Hull Pots and then on the new section of path over Whitber Hill to rejoin the Pennine Way for a while, before passing High Birkwith and along the Ribble Way until Nether Lodge is reached. A track is then walked along up to Gauber Road (B6479), which is then followed for about one mile to reach the Ribblehead Viaduct. The Three Peaks Walk then follows parts 2 and 3 (see separate text) over Whernside and Ingleborough to arrive back at Horton in Ribblesdale. The route as described is the preferred route the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority would prefer you to walk, so that the majority of the walk is then on well maintained paths and helps prevent further erosion.

Yorkshire Three Peaks Walk - Part 2: Ribblehead to the Old Hill Inn
The Yorkshire Three Peaks Walk is a very demanding but rewarding walk, which takes in the summits of Pen-y-ghent (694 metres - 2,276 feet), Whernside (736 metres - 2,415 feet) and Ingleborough (723 metres 2,372 feet) all in one circular route. There is no set starting point, but the vast majority of walkers start at Horton in Ribblesdale, taking in the summits in the order shown above. The walk follows on from part 1 of the Three Peaks Walk (see separate text) which goes over Pen-y-ghent to arrive at the Ribblehead Viaduct. This second section as described here starts from the Ribblehead Viaduct and heads alongside the railway for just under two miles, before heading up Grain Ings and then across the stone flags to pull in alongside a wall that is then followed to Whernside's summit. The walk then continues by the wall, before dropping down to Bruntscar and along Philpin Lane to reach the B6255 about 50 yards from the Old Hill Inn. The Three Peaks Walk then follows part 3 (see separate text) over Ingleborough to arrive back at Horton in Ribblesdale. The route as described is the preferred route the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority would prefer you to walk, so that the majority of the walk is on well maintained paths and helps prevent further erosion.

Yorkshire Three Peaks Walk - Part 3: Old Hill Inn to Horton in Ribblesdale
The Yorkshire Three Peaks Walk is a very demanding but rewarding walk, which takes in the summits of Pen-y-ghent (694 metres - 2,276 feet), Whernside (736 metres - 2,415 feet) and Ingleborough (723 metres 2,372 feet) all in one circular route. There is no set starting point, but the vast majority of walkers start at Horton in Ribblesdale, taking in the summits in the order shown above. The Three Peaks Walk first follows parts 1 and 2 (see separate text) from Horton in Ribblesdale over Pen-y-ghent to arrive at the Ribblehead viaduct and then on over Whernside to reach the Old Hill Inn. This third and final section as described here, starts from the Old Hill Inn and heads along the base of Southerscales Scar and across Humphrey Bottom to start the climb up to Ingleborough's summit. From there the walk retraces back across the summit plateau and then heads across Simon Fell Breast, down to Sulber and across the railway to arrive back in Horton in Ribblesdale. The route as described is the preferred route the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority would prefer you to walk, so that the majority of the walk is on well maintained paths and helps prevent further erosion.

Yorkshire Three Peaks Walk - Pen-y-ghent > Whernside > Ingleborough
The Yorkshire Three Peaks Walk is a very demanding but rewarding walk, which takes in the summits of Pen-y-ghent (694 metres - 2,276 feet), Whernside (736 metres - 2,415 feet) and Ingleborough (723 metres 2,372 feet) all in one circular route. There is no set starting point, but the vast majority of walkers start at Horton in Ribblesdale and climb Pen-y-ghent before ariving at Ribblehead after taking in parts of the Pennine Way and the Ribble Way. From Ribblehead, the walk continues up Grain Ings and over Whernside on its way to Bruntscar and along Philpin Lane to the Old Hill Inn. The last part of the walk leaves the Old Hill Inn and climbs up Ingleborough on its way back in Horton in Ribblesdale via Southerscales Scar and Simon Fell Breast. The route as described is the preferred route the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority would prefer you to walk, so that the majority of the walk is on well maintained paths and helps prevent further erosion.

 

Copyright © Walks4all Limited 2022

Walk selector
Yorkshire Dales and the surrounding area

 

Aysgarth Waterfalls walk from Aysgarth
A circular from the National Park Centre at Aysgarth in Wensleydale taking in three flights of waterfalls in a delightful short woodland walk. The waterfalls have been a popular attraction since the early 19th century, when Wordsworth used to visit. Turner and Ruskin have painted the falls and they were even the setting for a fight scene in the Hollywood film Robin Hood - Prince of Thieves. The walk takes in Middle and then Lower falls before heading out past Hollins house where you get a view of Castle Bolton. The return is via St Josephs and Freeholders' woods before passing back through the car park before visiting the Upper Falls.

Ellerbeck and Bruntscar walk from Chapel-le-Dale
In looking at a ratio of effort put in to a walk in relation to views attained, this walk must rate very highly. The walk, all on tracks, lanes and a short section of a 'B' road is suitable in all weathers, as it keeps quite low, but the views on clear days of Ingleborough, Whernside, Ribblehead viaduct and the general Yorkshire Dales scenery are simply outstanding. The walk follows a short circular route from Chapel-le-Dale, past the church along the track to Ellerbeck. It then heads along the base of Whernside to Bruntscar before joining part of the 'Yorkshire 3 Peaks' route back down to 'B' road near the Old Hill Inn and then on to the car park.

Feizor Circular walk from Austwick
A circular walk starting from the Game Cock Pub in Austwick, mainly along tracks so suitable for wetter days. The walk passes around Oxenber and Wharfe woods and offers excellent views of the typical dales landscape. As soon as height is gained there are wonderful panoramic views of initially Ingleborough and its surrounds and then further on around to Pen-y-ghent and Fountains Fell. If your timing is right, there is a tea room in Feizor to have a short break from the walk! There is also an alternative parallel, mainly field path, which can be taken on the return from Feizor.

Ingleborough walk via Ingleborough Cave, Trow Gill, Gaping Gill and Little Ingleborough
Ingleborough, one of the 'Yorkshire 3 Peaks', is arrived at by way of way of 3 natural delights of the Yorkshire Dales. Leaving Clapham, the path makes its way up to Ingleborough Cave, where time can be spent visiting one of the best show caves in the country. Then on to Gaping Gill, a 105m deep pothole by way of Trow Gill, an ever narrowing gorge. Little Ingleborough is ascended on the way up to Ingleborough's summit. The walk heads down to Sulber and then affords wonderful views across Moughton Scars, before returning to Clapham via Long Lane.

Ingleton Waterfalls walk from Ingleton
The Ingleton waterfalls walk in the Yorkshire Dales is one of the most spectacular waterfall and woodland walks in the UK - if Carlsberg did waterfall walks, this would probably be the best waterfall walk in the world! The walk is easy to follow and passes Pecca Falls, Hollybush Spout, Thornton Force, Beezley Falls, Rival Falls, Baxenghyll Gorge and Snow Falls. The trail leads through ancient oak woodland and typical Yorkshire Dales scenery via these stunning waterfalls and other geological features. A good time to go is a day or two after heavy or prolonged rain, with my personal favourite being late April, with the spring flowers in full bud but before the leaves come back on the trees. The walk is open seven days a week, throughout the year (closed Christmas Day) and opens at 9am. Closing times vary throughout the year.

Janet's Foss, Gordale Scar and Malham Cove walk from Malham
A circular from Malham, taking in all the natural wonders the area has to offer. Malham is a small village in the Yorkshire Dales, but is a great draw amongst walkers, ornithologists and tourists in general, due to the easy accessibility of the natural wonders surrounding it. The walk starts in the village centre and follows Malham beck and then Gordale beck, before passing through a delightful wooded area to reveal Janet's Foss, a waterfall set in its own little amphitheatre. A few yards further on, Gordale Scar is reached, a gorge with limestone cliffs over 100m high. The walk retraces its steps to Gordale bridge and then on over a short climb to reach the limestone pavement above Malham Cove. After admiring the pavement, head down to the foot of the cove and away from it to reveal the cove in its full splendour. The cove is over 80m high and 300m wide and once was the site of a waterfall higher than Niagara falls! The cove is a favourite with ornithologists, with the peregrine falcon a visitor here. From the cove, a gravelled path is followed back to the road, which leads through Malham back to the car park.

Pen-y-ghent walk from Horton in Ribblesdale
A circular from Horton in Ribblesdale over one of the 'Yorkshire Three Peaks'. The walk heads to Brackenbottom before climbing steadily over Brackenbottom Scar to join up with the Pennine Way path. This is followed up to the summit of Pen-y-ghent before dropping back down and returning via two short detours to Hunt and Hull Pots. The return to Horton is then via the enclosed walled Horton Scar lane, which offers panoramic views of the whole area.

Place Fell walk from Patterdale
A circular from Patterdale up to Boredale Hause and then around up on to Place Fell itself. Wainwright said of Place Fell "Few fells are so well favoured as Place Fell for appraising neighbouring heights. It occupies an exceptionally good position in the curve of Ullswater, in the centre of a great bowl of hills; its summit commands a very beautiful and impressive panorama. On a first visit to Patterdale, Place Fell should be an early objective, for no other viewpoint gives such an appreciation of the design of this lovely corner of Lakeland." The walk then follows the broad ridge to the North-East to gradually descend close to Scalehow Beck and its waterfalls to reach Ullswater. The final three miles of the walk back to Patterdale follow close to the shore of Ullswater along its undulating shoreline path.

Ruskin's View and St Mary's Church walk from Devil's Bridge, Kirkby Lonsdale
This easy stroll is a wonderful way to see Kirkby Lonsdale and its many delights, the only climb being the '86' radical steps just before you reach Ruskin's view. This short circular walk can be started from any part of the walk and if you want to break off to enjoy Kirkby Lonsdale's many shops, narrow lanes, pubs, restaurants and tea rooms, you can. Kirkby Lonsdale is a historic market town, known by many for Devil's Bridge, dating back to around 1370 and Ruskin's view, which he described as the loveliest view in England and therefore the world. The scene has also been painted by Turner. Both these are visited on this short walk. The centre of Kirkby Lonsdale is a mix of elegant well preserved 18th-century buildings and stone cottages built around cobbled courtyards and narrow alleyways with names such as Salt Pie Lane, Horse Market and Jingling Lane.

Whernside walk from Ribblehead Viaduct
A circular from the Ribblehead Viaduct over one of the 'Yorkshire Three Peaks'. The walk follows the 'Three Peaks walk' path for most of its route, initially following alongside the Settle to Carlisle railway line, before heading up on the path towards Dent. The path then steepens over Knoutberry Hill before following a wall along to the summit of Whernside. The panorama from here ranges from Pendle Hill to the South, round to the Morecambe Bay and then the Lakeland Fells and the Howgills. The return is via a steep drop down to Bruntscar, before leaving the 'Three Peaks path' to turn left eventually passing Winterscales to come out through a tunnel under the railway. The outward path is then followed for the short journey back to the parking area.

Yorkshire Three Peaks Walk - Part 1: Horton in Ribblesdale to Ribblehead
The Yorkshire Three Peaks Walk is a very demanding but rewarding walk, which takes in the summits of Pen-y-ghent (694 metres - 2,276 feet), Whernside (736 metres - 2,415 feet) and Ingleborough (723 metres 2,372 feet) all in one circular route. There is no set starting point, but the vast majority of walkers start at Horton in Ribblesdale, taking in the summits in the order shown above. This first section as described here starts from Horton in Ribblesdale and heads via Brackenbottom up to pick up the Pennine Way and on over Pen-y-ghent. The route heads on close to Hunt and Hull Pots and then on the new section of path over Whitber Hill to rejoin the Pennine Way for a while, before passing High Birkwith and along the Ribble Way until Nether Lodge is reached. A track is then walked along up to Gauber Road (B6479), which is then followed for about one mile to reach the Ribblehead Viaduct. The Three Peaks Walk then follows parts 2 and 3 (see separate text) over Whernside and Ingleborough to arrive back at Horton in Ribblesdale. The route as described is the preferred route the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority would prefer you to walk, so that the majority of the walk is then on well maintained paths and helps prevent further erosion.

Yorkshire Three Peaks Walk - Part 2: Ribblehead to the Old Hill Inn
The Yorkshire Three Peaks Walk is a very demanding but rewarding walk, which takes in the summits of Pen-y-ghent (694 metres - 2,276 feet), Whernside (736 metres - 2,415 feet) and Ingleborough (723 metres 2,372 feet) all in one circular route. There is no set starting point, but the vast majority of walkers start at Horton in Ribblesdale, taking in the summits in the order shown above. The walk follows on from part 1 of the Three Peaks Walk (see separate text) which goes over Pen-y-ghent to arrive at the Ribblehead Viaduct. This second section as described here starts from the Ribblehead Viaduct and heads alongside the railway for just under two miles, before heading up Grain Ings and then across the stone flags to pull in alongside a wall that is then followed to Whernside's summit. The walk then continues by the wall, before dropping down to Bruntscar and along Philpin Lane to reach the B6255 about 50 yards from the Old Hill Inn. The Three Peaks Walk then follows part 3 (see separate text) over Ingleborough to arrive back at Horton in Ribblesdale. The route as described is the preferred route the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority would prefer you to walk, so that the majority of the walk is on well maintained paths and helps prevent further erosion.

Yorkshire Three Peaks Walk - Part 3: Old Hill Inn to Horton in Ribblesdale
The Yorkshire Three Peaks Walk is a very demanding but rewarding walk, which takes in the summits of Pen-y-ghent (694 metres - 2,276 feet), Whernside (736 metres - 2,415 feet) and Ingleborough (723 metres 2,372 feet) all in one circular route. There is no set starting point, but the vast majority of walkers start at Horton in Ribblesdale, taking in the summits in the order shown above. The Three Peaks Walk first follows parts 1 and 2 (see separate text) from Horton in Ribblesdale over Pen-y-ghent to arrive at the Ribblehead viaduct and then on over Whernside to reach the Old Hill Inn. This third and final section as described here, starts from the Old Hill Inn and heads along the base of Southerscales Scar and across Humphrey Bottom to start the climb up to Ingleborough's summit. From there the walk retraces back across the summit plateau and then heads across Simon Fell Breast, down to Sulber and across the railway to arrive back in Horton in Ribblesdale. The route as described is the preferred route the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority would prefer you to walk, so that the majority of the walk is on well maintained paths and helps prevent further erosion.

Yorkshire Three Peaks Walk - Pen-y-ghent > Whernside > Ingleborough
The Yorkshire Three Peaks Walk is a very demanding but rewarding walk, which takes in the summits of Pen-y-ghent (694 metres - 2,276 feet), Whernside (736 metres - 2,415 feet) and Ingleborough (723 metres 2,372 feet) all in one circular route. There is no set starting point, but the vast majority of walkers start at Horton in Ribblesdale and climb Pen-y-ghent before ariving at Ribblehead after taking in parts of the Pennine Way and the Ribble Way. From Ribblehead, the walk continues up Grain Ings and over Whernside on its way to Bruntscar and along Philpin Lane to the Old Hill Inn. The last part of the walk leaves the Old Hill Inn and climbs up Ingleborough on its way back in Horton in Ribblesdale via Southerscales Scar and Simon Fell Breast. The route as described is the preferred route the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority would prefer you to walk, so that the majority of the walk is on well maintained paths and helps prevent further erosion.

 

 

Copyright © Walks4all Limited 2022